Walden Pond Apartment Homes

1400-A Weeping Willow Drive, Lynchburg, VA 24501
Call: 855-755-8732 Email UsPondApt004@myLTSMail.com View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: Closed

$696-$1,308

Apartment Homes Lynchburg VA Blog

One of America’s Cheapest States to Live – Lynchburg, VA

One of America’s Cheapest States to Live – Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, April 24, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VACNBC scored all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Cost of living is one of the key categories of competitiveness, worth a possible 75 points toward a state's overall Top States score.

This year some states were tied. But Virginia ranked high on the list .

#13 Virginia

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

CNBC


Is This Apartment in Lynchburg, VA Right for You?

Is This Apartment in Lynchburg, VA Right for You?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAThe adventure of finding an apartment you like is like trying to find a college or trying to find a good group of friends. You have to test things out or look into them before making your decision. You have to narrow down your options to figure out what is best for you and make the best out of what you have chosen.

Whether you are apartment hunting by yourself or with others, trust your gut. Every apartment complex will have its own way of doing things and have its own original environment. Your goal is to find the one that speaks to your personality and the one you will be happy living in. There are no trial periods when it comes to renting an apartment — if you want to leave early then you will have to fork over some major cash to break your lease.

What you want in an apartment is up to you. You could want a renovated apartment or you could want washer and dryer connections, or something even more elaborate. You need to know if where you are living is right for you. It may not be exactly what you want, but how do you determine whether or not the apartment community is something to keep in the running when you are making your final decisions.

You will want what you want, but you also want to be smart about what you want. The idea of picking an apartment just because it is pretty or because they simply have a nice exterior will tell you nothing about what else is surrounding it. Or it won’t tell you what it’s like to live there.

Here are few tips on how to know if an apartment community is right for you.

1. Neighboring surroundings: Take a look around the place first. See what is in the proximity. Say you like to go out to eat a lot, try to pick some place that has a lot of food options. If you have a child and want a good school to send them to, keep that in mind.

Also, while you are doing your hunting, pay attention to the neighbors you see as you are walking through the complex. Sometimes places can unfortunately be defined by the people that live there. And this reigns true about apartment complexes, most of the time.

2. Security: You want to feel safe where you live and without the right kind of security you might not feel that way. Make sure to ask about this when you are being shown around by a leasing agent. Your safety needs do not need to be looked over or disregarded.

If high security is something that will make it feel right to you, then make sure you look for that when you are apartment hunting. Sometimes a neighborhood watch just doesn’t cut it for people.

3. Management/maintenance: You are going to want to make sure the people that will be fixing your needs in the apartment are up to par or at least to your standards. Do they fix things in a timely manner? Are they polite and accommodating? Do they let you know when they are stopping by to look over things? Do they let you know things about the complex ahead of time?

This is when reviews on the internet may come into handy. No leasing agent is going to tell you that they have an issue with maintenance, but reviewers online will tell you straight up.

4. Too many compromises: Sometimes you have to forgo what you want a little to find a space that feels good to you. You may have to give up that breakfast nook for an extra storage space. But sometimes you tend to give up things you don’t have to.

Make sure that what you are picking is at least 80-90 percent what you want in the apartment. You want to feel comfortable and not like you gave up everything you had in mind. With that type of mindset you won’t be happy whatsoever and living like that for six months to a year will be utterly miserable.

Apartments put freedom and stress in the same sentence, but finding the best one for you can take a bit of the stress off your shoulders. Keep what you want in mind, but also remember to keep an open mind, because sometimes you will find something you didn’t even know you wanted.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

uloop.com


Tips for Students Who are Apartment Hunting in Lynchburg, VA

Tips for Students Who are Apartment Hunting in Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VAApartment Hunting can be a bit stressful unless you already know where you want to live and it’s available, then this most likely won’t apply to you. Right now, many students are doing their fair share of apartment hunting in Lynchburg, VA. Looking for an apartment can be easy when you follow these tips:

1. Set a budget: You should set a budget for how low and how high you’re willing to pay for rent, also factor in bills ( Light, Cable, Wifi etc.)

2. What amenities can you live with and without: do you want your apartment to have a gym, be pet-friendly, in-unit washer and dryer, balcony, fireplace etc. figure out what you can live with and live without too narrow down your choices.

3. Pick an area: Do you want to live Uptown, Downtown, gated community, near your school, near your job, near your favorite shopping center etc. you should feel comfortable in the area you choose to live.

4. Take an in-person tour of the apartment: don’t just trust and go off the floor plan, get a feel for how much space you’ll have to work with. Bonus: visit the apartment during the night as well to get a feel for parking and night activity.

5. Ask about leasing options, security deposit, what they require of you before you sign a lease.

6. Figure out if you want a roommate: if yes make sure the person is trustworthy and that you all mesh well together.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond Apartments.

#HowYouLive
campuslately.com


It is Cheaper to Rent Than Own in Every State - Lynchburg, VA

It is Cheaper to Rent Than Own in Every State - Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, April 03, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAOwning a home is often considered the American dream — and it’s an expensive one. Homeowners in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., pay from 33% to 93% more for housing each month than do renters living in the same state, according to a new NerdWallet analysis.

But many homeowners reap benefits that you can’t get from renting. The equity you build can be leveraged for loans that can be used to improve the home and boost its value or be used in financial emergencies.

While renting can’t offer thosefinancial benefits, it’s cheaper to rent on a month-to-month basis. If you’re wondering how to save money for a down payment, renting can help you build that nest egg — but in extremely expensive or competitive markets, renting might be better for the long haul.

To determine the monthly homeownership premium — the additional cost of owning instead of renting, expressed as a percentage — NerdWallet compared 2015 American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau for the median gross rent and median homeownership cost in each state and Washington, D.C. Median gross rent includes the costs of monthly rent and utilities for all kinds of rental properties, and median homeownership cost includes monthly mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance and utilities. This comparison doesn’t include the down payment required to buy a home, which is traditionally 20% of the home price for conventional mortgages, but is lower for FHA or VA loans.

Key takeaways

  • Owning is more expensive everywhere. Across all 50 states and Washington, D.C., it costs more each month to own a home than to rent. The median cost people pay nationwide to own a home is 54% more than the median cost to rent each month.
  • The smallest difference is still a third more to own.
  • In some states, the cost of owning far eclipses renting.

State: Virginia
Homeownership Premium: 48%
Median Monthly Cost to Own: $1692
Median Monthly Cost to Rent: $1144
Difference: $548

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA, contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive
NerdWallet


Virginia is One of America's Top States for Business 2016 - Lynchburg, VA

Virginia is One of America's Top States for Business 2016 - Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 27, 2017

Walden Pond, Apartments in Lynchburg, VAWe score all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Our study is not an opinion survey. We rely on tangible numbers to gauge each state's performance, scoring all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, using publicly available data.

Here are our categories and this year's weightings.

Workforce - We rate states based on the education level of their workforce, the numbers of available employees, and the states' demonstrated abilities to retain college-educated workers. We measure workforce productivity based on each state's economic output per job. We look at the relative success of each state's worker training programs in placing their participants in jobs. We also consider union membership and the states' right-to-work laws.

Cost of Doing Business - We look at the competitiveness of each state's tax climate, as well as state-sponsored incentives that can lower the cost of doing business. Utility costs can add up to a huge expense for business, and they vary widely by state. We also consider the cost of wages, as well as rental costs for office and industrial space.

Infrastructure - We measure the vitality of each state's transportation system by the value of goods shipped by air, waterways, roads and rail. We look at the availability of air travel in each state, the quality of the roads and bridges, and the time it takes to commute to work.

Economy - We look at economic growth, job creation, consumer spending, and the health of the residential real estate market. We measure each state's fiscal health by looking at its credit ratings and outlook, as well as its overall budget picture. We also consider the number of major corporations headquartered in each state.

Quality of Life - We score the states on livability, including several factors, such as the crime rate; inclusiveness, such as antidiscrimination protections; the quality of health care; the level of health insurance coverage and the overall health of the population. We evaluate local attractions, parks and recreation, as well as environmental quality.

Technology & Innovation - We evaluate the states on their support for innovation, the number of patents issued to their residents and the record of high-tech business formation. We also consider federal health, science and agricultural research grants to the states.

Education - Higher-education institutions offer companies a source to recruit new talent, as well as a partner in research and development. We consider the number of higher-education institutions in each state, as well as long-term funding trends for higher education. We look at several measures of K–12 education, including test scores, class size and spending. We also look digital and lifelong learning opportunities in each state.

Business Friendliness - But we grade the states on the freedom their legal and regulatory frameworks provide for business.

Cost of Living- The cost of living helps drive the cost of doing business. From housing to food and energy, wages go further when the cost of living is low.

Access to Capital - We look at venture capital investments by state, as well as small-business lending on a relative basis.

Virginia is #13 on the list of America's Top States for Business.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive
cnbc.com


Virginia is One of the Most Successful States In America – Lynchburg, VA

Virginia is One of the Most Successful States In America – Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 20, 2017

Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VAZippia did a breakdown of what the most successful states might be. Might they be states containing the most successful cities? Are these states doing something better than yours is? And is good ice cream a key to their success?

The answers? No, Probably, and most definitely. But we’ll get to methodology in a moment (ice cream was not one of our criteria…) First, here are the 10 most successful states:

  1. New Hampshire
  2. Maryland
  3. Minnesota
  4. North Dakota
  5. Hawaii
  6. Wyoming
  7. Alaska
  8. Virginia
  9. Utah
  10. Massachusetts

Virginia:

Of all the states we looked at (which would be… all of them…) Virginia had the eighth highest median income. Residents here were also the ninth least impoverished, overall, and the 14th least likely to be unemployed. Congrats, Old Dominion!

How We Determined the Most Successful States in America

The first thing that comes to most capitalist minds in terms of success is—money. After all, rich people must be successful, right?

Meh. Maybe. But we think there’s a bit more that goes into it than that. So we looked at this set of criteria from the 2010-2014 American Community Survey:

  • Poverty Level
  • Median Household Income
  • Unemployment Rate

Median household income is the most digestible way to understand how wealthy a place really is. The unemployment rate tries to capture the prospects for more people to become rich. And finally, if more people are employed, the brighter (and more successful) that place’s future looks.

After we collected the data for all 50 states, we ranked each from 1 to 50 for each of the criteria, with 1 being the most successful.

We then averaged all the rankings for a place into a “Success Score” with the state having the lowest overall Success Score crowned the “Most Successful State in America.”

As you saw, Virginia came in number 8. For information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond Apartments.

#HowYouLive
zippia.com


Is Well-Being Important to You? Live in an Apartment in Lynchburg, VA

Is Well-Being Important to You? Live in an Apartment in Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 13, 2017

Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VAGallup and Healthways have released the State of American Well-Being: 2016 Community Well-Being Rankings report, which highlights important trends in health and well-being within communities across the nation.

Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island, FL, tops the rankings for a second consecutive year. Barnstable Town, MA was number two, followed by Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA.

Many high well-being communities hail from California (seven in the top 25), Colorado (three), Texas (three), Florida (two) and Virginia (two).

Communities are uniquely positioned to promote well-being improvement by transforming policies and environment so that people move naturally, eat wisely, connect, and have the right outlook—all of which can lead to living longer, better.

The Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being 2016 Community Rankings was released on Tuesday. The report measures how residents of 189 U.S. cities feel about their physical health, social ties, financial security, community and sense of purpose.

Residents report having good physical health, feeling proud about their community, enjoying good relationships and liking what they do each day.

You may think that has a lot to do with living in a scenic, affluent beach community, but those factors don't influence the score as much as you’d expect. Income matters, but it doesn’t ensure high well-being.

The top 10 U.S. communities with the highest well-being are:

  1. Naples–Immokalee–Marco Island, Florida
  2. Barnstable Town, Massachusetts
  3. Santa Cruz–Watsonville, California
  4. Honolulu, Hawaii
  5. Charlottesville, Virginia
  6. North Port–Sarasota–Bradenton, Florida
  7. San Luis Obispo–Paso Robles, California
  8. Lynchburg, Virginia
  9. Hilton Head Island–Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina
  10. Boulder, Colorado

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA, contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive
well-beingindex.com


Do's and Don’ts in Apartment Hunting – Lynchburg, VA

Do's and Don’ts in Apartment Hunting – Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 06, 2017
Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VANow that students are finally getting comfortable in their spring semester routines, many are starting to think about living situations for next year.

While some may be happy renewing their leases, others have been counting down the days to look for a new place.

Maybe students are annoyed with their roommates, want to live closer to campus or they are ready for apartment life after spending a year in the dorms.

No matter what the issue is, apartment hunting is confusing, stressful and overwhelming, especially for the first time.

Here are some do’s and don’ts of apartment hunting to make the whole process easier.

Do calculate a budget and learn about the leasing process.

Before asking to live with friends and heading out on apartment tours, calculate a personal price range, because it may differ from potential roommates.

Apartments are not cheap, so discuss a budget with parents and friends before wasting time touring a complex that ends up being too expensive.

Calculating a budget is what allows students to set up a blueprint of what they want and what they can realistically afford.

It forces them to prioritize and makes a sea of daunting apartment complexes a little more manageable, so it must be step one.

Talking to parents can also be educational on the leasing process as a whole, which can sound like a foreign language to first time apartment hunters.

Ask questions beforehand to avoid getting lost in the jargon and technicalities of a lease.

You’ll wish you knew more about the leasing process. When you have to rely on asking parents or roommates for a lot of it and it can make the whole apartment hunting process a lot more stressful.

Don’t assume everything is included in the rent.

It is an immediate red flag if an apartment’s rent seems outrageously cheap, so it is extremely important to ask what is included before receiving a bill twice the anticipated amount.

Make sure if you’re paying more you’re getting something out of it. If you’re paying less make …  sure you understand why and what you’re going to have to pay for instead.

A number of complexes do not include electricity, gas, water, parking, Wi-Fi or cable in the rent, so consider how much those necessities will be used and add that cost to the rent to create a more accurate monthly payment.

Factor in distance.

Living close to campus is convenient and close-by complexes that are not within immediate walking distance also offer shuttles to campus.

Think about how much time is needed to get ready in the morning, and if it is feasible to wake up about an hour earlier to catch the shuttle or walk to class.

However, some students value other amenities over distance.

Everyone is different, so consider distance when apartment hunting and how important it is in comparison to other attributes being looked for.

Don’t agree with roommates just to make the process easier.

Sometimes it is okay to be selfish, especially in regards to living situations.

This does not necessarily mean be difficult for the sake of being difficult, but if there is something absolutely and uncompromisingly essential, do not be afraid to stand firm on it, even if roommates disagree.

It may be tempting to be agreeable just to move the process along faster, but it will be a regretted decision a few months down the road.

Worst case scenario, it is possible to meet and live with brand new roommates.

While that seems frightening, it is often a better option than living with friends who constantly disagree, or paying to live somewhere unhappily.

Meeting new roommates can often lead to lifelong friendships that would not have happened otherwise, and may save old friendships that could have been ruined by living together.

There will always be great people to live with. If you don’t want to live in a place but your friends do, don’t feel like you have to give up the things you want. You are, after all, going to be paying and living there.

Do talk to people who live in the complexes.

Apartment tour guides are obviously going to try to make a complex seem like the best one out there.

However, the immaculate show rooms are not always reflective of what life in the apartment is really like.

Avoid making snap judgments based on a small sample of experiences.

It’s good to get a wide range of opinions. Read online reviews and try to get a full idea of what you’re getting yourself into. Don’t just go off of the first positive or negative review you hear.

Leasing office employees can discuss all the specifics and perks of the apartment complex, but the tenants are the only ones who really know what it is like to live there.

They will most likely be students who have similar views when it comes to apartment hunting, so their opinions will certainly be valuable.

Do get excited about the chosen apartment.

Above all, live somewhere that makes moving day something to look forward to. Do not put happiness on the back burner, make the money being put into the apartment well worth it.

It’s basically your home away from home. It has to be a comforting environment that you actually enjoy living in.

With so many options, there is definitely an apartment out there for everyone.

It may take time and compromise to find it, but living happily in a great place will make the hassle of apartment hunting pay off in the end.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond Apartments.

#HowYouLive
thedailyaztec.com


Benefits of Living in Off Campus Apartments in Lynchburg, VA

Benefits of Living in Off Campus Apartments in Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 27, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAIt Can Be Cheaper

There's a good chance you'll save money by renting a house or apartment and splitting it with friends. These days, you can expect to spend close to $10,000 per year on room and board, but some schools charge $15,000 a year or more. Find a place that accommodates multiple housemates, and you can cut your costs by splitting the rent and utilities.

You Can Make Your Own Rules

Living in a dorm is fun and all, but it does come with certain restrictions. When you rent your own place off campus, you don't have to worry about quiet hours, nor do you have to feel guilty when you'd rather curl up in bed rather than participate in your living hall's weekly social event. You can go crazy turning on halogen lamps and plugging in hot plates, and there won’t be a soul around to write you up for it.

You Get More Living Space

Dorm rooms don't give you much space. Rent off campus and you may wind up with more square footage at your disposal. Another benefit of off campus living is the possibility of having your own bedroom, or even your own bathroom.

You Have More Food Choices

It may be nice not having to cook, but dining hall food isn't exactly known to be high in quality. And chances are your meal plan isn't all that economical, as you're paying for the convenience of having someone else prepare your food. When you live off campus, you can cook for yourself.

You'll Be More Prepared for the Real World

Living off campus means doing adult-style things like paying individual utility bills and going grocery shopping. Sure, that stuff can be time-consuming, but it's a good way to get ready for life outside your college campus.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA, contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive
brassmagazine.com


Looking for Your First Apartment in Lynchburg, VA

Looking for Your First Apartment in Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 20, 2017

Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VAMaybe you are graduating from college and have your first real job, or perhaps you want to move off-campus next year for the first time. After living with your parents a few months and saving a little money, you’re ready to strike out on your own and find your first apartment.

But with student loan debt, staying within your budget can be a challenge and navigating the rental market can be daunting.

Here are a few things you need to know before renting your first apartment:

  • You will need to know what your budget will be. Make sure you know whether the bottom-line rent payment includes — or does not include — utilities. If it does not, you will need to find out approximately how much utilities are so you’ll know whether you can afford the unit.
  • If you find you can’t afford the rent, consider finding a roommate or roommates. Make sure that the person or people you are considering as roommates will be reliable. If you are signing a lease with other people, you want to make sure you can count on them to pay their portion of the rent and utilities. Another way to find a more reasonably priced rental home is to be willing to go a bit farther from the center of the city. If you rely on public transportation, sometimes considering taking the bus to Metro or commuting fully by bus can give you more choices, including less-expensive rents and ways to get you more items on your wish list, such as a nicer kitchen.
  • Make a list of your needs in order of priority. You should have a list of mandatory items, among them, perhaps, walking distance to the Metro; a parking spot; laundry on the premises; the number of bedrooms you need; and a dishwasher. Make a list of items you don’t need but would consider a bonus to have — a pet-friendly building, a balcony, an on-site fitness center and wood floors, perhaps. Determine what you can and cannot be flexible on.
  • Be prepared for when you find the apartment you like best. You should have all the information you will need to put on an application at your fingertips. If you have never had a credit card or paid any bills in your name, you might not have a credit history. A landlord will want to have some history of bill payment, so you may need to ask a parent or a relative to act as a guarantor on the lease. Know who that person is and have them ready to submit an application with you as a co-applicant.
  • You should also be prepared to have up to two months’ rent for a security deposit and the first month’s rent. A security deposit may be less than one month’s rent, but it is better to be prepared just in case. You should also be prepared with application fees.
  • Have a copy of current pay stubs or an offer letter from your employer stating your salary and a contact who can confirm your salary.
  • Have one or two personal references available for a landlord to contact.
  • Be cautious. Rental scams abound. If you cannot personally view the home you are considering renting, make sure a friend or a family member can see it on your behalf.
  • Once you are approved to move forward on the lease, take time to review it carefully. Know what you are responsible for and what the landlord is responsible for concerning maintenance and utilities. Make sure there is an emergency number in case something breaks and needs to be fixed, such as plumbing issues.
  • Know how much notice will be given to you as a tenant for an increase in rent; the landlord to enter the property; and other like scenarios.
  • Know any fees in addition to your rent. Make sure all people who are to be on the lease are on the lease. Find out what is included in the rent and what is not. If you’re moving into a condo or a co-op, learn about any rules and regulations you need to abide by, and make sure you have a copy of them.

Once the lease is signed by all parties, make sure you know if you need to transfer utilities into your name and which utility companies to contact. If you are moving into an apartment, condo or co-op building, check to see if you need to schedule your move-in date with the building.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive
washingtonpost.com



Walden Pond Apartment Homes

1400-A Weeping Willow Drive, Lynchburg, VA 24501

Call: 855-755-8732
Email UsPondApt004@myLTSMail.com
View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: Closed

$696-$1,308