Walden Pond Apartment Homes

1400-A Weeping Willow Drive, Lynchburg, VA 24501
Call: 855-755-8732 Email UsPondApt004@myLTSMail.com View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: Closed

$696-$1,308

Apartment Homes Lynchburg VA Blog

Tips for Finding the Perfect Roommate

Tips for Finding the Perfect Roommate

Joseph Coupal - Monday, July 31, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAFound your dream apartment? Congratulations! Now it’s time to find your dream roommate. Roommates can make or break your living situation so here is some very good advice to help with your search.

1) Make sure you have a similar budget

Having a roommate is a great way to save some big bucks, but before you sign a lease make sure you and your roommate having similar price expectations. If you’re looking to rent a cheaper apartment to save money for a downpayment (or your next trip to Mexico), you shouldn’t move in with your BFF who wants to live in a penthouse and spend her days eating caviar while overlooking the skyline. Before signing a lease make sure your roommate has the savings and income to pay for your rent and deposit. You don’t want to be stuck paying the full rent if your roommate bails!

And remember, rent is just part of your apartment budget. Don’t forget to discuss other costs such as utilities and furniture with your roommate. If you and your future roomie are going to split the costs of furnishing your apartment, you’ll need to agree on a realistic budget and determine where you’ll be shopping – whether that’s Pottery Barn, Ikea or Goodwill.

2) Find a roommate that meets your cleanliness standards

Cleanliness is one scenario where opposites definitely don’t attract! We’ve all had that messy roommate, and it sucks. They leave the sink full of dishes, spilled makeup on the bathroom counters, and clothes all over the living room. If you are someone who prefers a clean, neat apartment avoid a messy roommate (unless you’re willing to devote yourself to cleaning for two).

If you are planning on living with multiple roommates discussing cleanliness is even more important. More roommates equal more potential for mess and more opportunities to avoid chores.

If you’re the messy roommate, find another messy roommate so you don’t have a neat roommate constantly nagging you – and maybe consider adding a cleaning service to your budget.

3) Discuss schedules and lifestyle before signing the lease

If you love to spend weeknights listening to acoustic music and reading a good book, don’t move in with a roommate who likes to throw parties on Tuesdays. On the other hand, if you like to host parties and have friends over make sure that’s something your future roommate is comfortable with.

Don’t forget to ask your roommate if they are a morning or night person. If you’re a morning person and a light sleeper, you probably don’t want a roommate who has band practice every night. Make sure you have an agreement on appropriate noise levels before moving in together, especially if you plan to be asleep while they are awake (or vice versa).

It’s also important to discuss how often you plan to have out of town visitors and overnight guests. If you have friends visiting constantly to party all week, you need to have a roommate that’s comfortable with that. And for those of you in relationships, make an agreement with your roommate about how often your significant other can stay over before signing the lease. If your boyfriend or girlfriend is going to be like a third roommate, you better make sure they get along with your real roomie.

4) Living with your BFF

Let’s just start by saying it’s not always the best idea to move in with your best friend. Yes, it can be super fun, but it also has the potential to destroy your friendship. Just because you love spending every weekend playing basketball or drinking Moscow Mules with your BFF does not mean you are compatible to live together.

It might get awkward if your friend asks you to move in, but if you don’t think you’ll be happy living together just say no. Don’t risk losing your friendship over fights about chores or noise. If you have a friend you are compatible with, go ahead and move in together and enjoy getting to spend every day with your BFF.

Living with strangers might sound scary, but as long as you have a good understanding of each other’s lifestyle it can be a great experience. It’s even possible you’ll gain a new friend, and once you’ve successfully lived together you’ve probably gained a lifelong friendship. As for how to find out if a stranger (or your friend) would make a good roommate, your best source of information is their previous roommate – don’t be afraid to ask.

5) Split household responsibilities and costs

So you’ve found a roommate and decided to sign the lease, congrats! Before moving don’t forget to discuss logistics of living together. How are you going to set up and pay for utilities? Are you going to buy your own cleaning supplies and food or will you share? How will chores be divided? Are you each bringing half the furniture or will you shop together? Answering these questions beforehand will prevent fights down the line, and ensure you have electricity and water when you move in (always a plus).

Sharing food can be a great way to save money and prevent food from going bad, but make sure the costs are split in a way you are both happy with. If you decide not to share, ask permission before taking your roommate’s food. No one likes the roomie who’s constantly mooching condiments or stealing all their cookies. If any problems arise as you live together, make sure to bring them up because a passive aggressive roommate is literally the worst.

Conclusion

It’s safe to say we’ve all had some great roommates and some not so great ones, but you live and you learn. If you put some time into finding a great roommate, you will be rewarded with a fantastic living situation. And don’t forget to be a good roommate – it takes two to tango (and live together successfully).

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA, contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

apartmentlist.com


Should Millennials Rent or Own?

Should Millennials Rent or Own?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchurg, VAThere are many great debates in American pop culture.

Tupac or Biggie? Boyz II Men or Dru Hill? LeBron or Jordan? Mayonnaise or Miracle Whip?

One of the most intriguing debates finding traction in the world of Millennials and finance is the debate of whether to buy a home or to continue renting.

The Great Recession

Upon my graduating from Syracuse University in 2010, I was welcomed into the working world during the heart of The Great Recession. Caused in large part due to a bubble in home values and irresponsible subprime loans, The Great Recession left a scar on the hearts and minds of Millennials over what it means to own a home.

Seeing the incredible loss of value in homes during that period and shouldering a collective $1.4 trillion dollars in student loan debt, many millennials are asking whether it’s responsible to sign-up for an immovable asset and 30-year mortgage tied to owning a home.

A Case for Renting

The Millennial generation is the “own nothing” generation. You can rent a car from the curb nearest you. You can hail a taxi using an app and get a ride to brunch in a car you do not own. I’ve heard there’s a website that allows you to rent tools from nearby neighbors. Even companies founded in more recent years are making strides to own less to reduce or eliminate overhead.

A shift has happened wherein Millennials are considerate of the fact that ownership implies liability, and liability often means added costs.

Renting an apartment or home offers you the benefit of not being responsible for breakdowns or repairs. Renting provides a fixed monthly cost to factor into your monthly budget that does not change based on repairs or failure of appliances. For many, this lack of long-term responsibility presents peace-of-mind in not having to be concerned about the long-term welfare of your living space. It also absolves you from the imperative of maintaining your living space for the sake of keeping and increasing its value.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA, contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

Excerpts: blavity.com


Virginia Ranks High in List of "Best States"

Virginia Ranks High in List of "Best States"

Joseph Coupal - Monday, July 17, 2017

Walden Pond Apartments, Lynchburg, VA#11 Virginia

Some states shine in health care. Some soar in education. Some excel in both – or in much more. The Best States ranking of U.S. states draws on thousands of data points to measure how well states are performing for their citizens. In addition to health care and education, the metrics take into account a state’s economy, the opportunity it offers people, its roads, bridges, internet and other infrastructure, its public safety and the integrity and health of state government.

More weight was accorded to some state measures than others, based on a survey of what matters most to people. Health care and education were weighted most heavily. Then came the opportunity states offer their citizens, their crime & corrections and infrastructure. State economies followed closely in weighting, followed by measures of government administration.

OVERALL RANK OUT OF 50: Virginia is #11
HEALTH CARE #25
EDUCATION #10
CRIME & CORRECTIONS #6
INFRASTRUCTURE #24
OPPORTUNITY #11
ECONOMY #27
GOVERNMENT #2

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

US News


Tips for Renting with Roommates in Lynchburg, VA

Tips for Renting with Roommates in Lynchburg, VA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, July 10, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAAs the first college semester starts to wind down, many residents are looking for roommates to being next semester. Here are some tips when considering renting an apartment with friends or for when you are renting with a roommate you are just meeting.

1. A pre-lease group meeting.

Get together for the sole purpose of sorting out each of your expectations. Do not sugarcoat your feelings. We often think “we are all good friends and we have gotten along well for years. We are all very compatible.” Yes, but you have not lived together. One neat freak and two slobs is a dangerous combination.

2. Agree on house rules before going ahead.

Here are some sample questions to get started. Who does the dishes? How late can friends stay in the evening? How are food costs shared? Will food be stored daily so as not to attract critters? There are plenty of other questions to come up with together. An agreement between all roommates with some written rules will help in the future.

3. Are you moving? Finding the right place.

Maybe you are moving out of another apartment community and moving into a new apartment. Look around if you are moving. Is the apartment sparkling clean and ready to move-in? This is a good sign about the landlord or manager. If it is clean at the start, you will be expected to leave it in the same condition.

Look carefully at what is going on outside the apartment. Try to get a glimpse of other tenants or neighbors. Are the hallways well lite and clean? Is the building itself in good condition? If dirt, spider webs, dirty light fixtures with burnt out bulbs, broken windows, loose banisters, sticky doors and more, all represent a red flag. What is the condition of cars in the parking lot? Is the parking lot well-lit?

Schedule the appointment in the early evening, when people are returning from work. This can provide a good sense of place. Ask people, "I am thinking of renting here, what can you tell me about living here?" and listen closely to what they say.

For more information on renting an apartment in Lynchgburg, VA contact Walden Pond

#HowYouLive

enterprisenews.com


Questions to Ask Before Renting an Apartment

Questions to Ask Before Renting an Apartment

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Walden Pond, Lynchburg, VAIf you’re looking for an apartment, there are certain questions to ask a landlord before renting the place. After all, this is where you’ll be living—you’ll want to be crystal clear on the rules, right? So before you impulsively sign that lease, make sure to stop, take a breath, and make a few simple inquiries to make sure this rental is right for you.

1. What is included in the rent, and what fees will I have to pay?

Rent is just part of your living for the month—the biggest part—so you need to be sure you can comfortably cover all other costs of living in that space. Most apartments will include water and sewage as part of the rent, but heat, water, gas, electricity, trash, internet, and even pest control can be separate costs.

You should also ask which of those services you will need to set up yourself. If the gas or electricity is in your name, you’ll need to have money available for the deposit most utility companies require.

2. How many people can live here, and what is your visitor policy?

If you’re planning to live with roommates, make sure you comply with the occupancy standards of the apartment.

Most buildings don’t allow more than two people per bedroom, including children. Also, if you plan to have frequent or long-term guests, find out what the landlord’s policies on that are.

Most landlords will want to know if you have a guest staying more than a certain number of days.

3. Is my deposit refundable?

Make sure you have clarity about what part of the money you give your landlord upfront is an administration fee, and what is a deposit. Some deposits are fully refundable if the apartment is returned in good condition, and some are not. If the deposit is significant, spell out in the lease what the conditions of its return are.

4. Do you accept pets, and if so, are there restricted pets?

If you have animals in your life, your search might be a little more difficult, especially if your companions are exotic.

Many landlords and management companies charge a pet deposit, a nonrefundable pet fee, or even a monthly pet rent. Find out in advance what your furry pals are going to cost you.

5. What’s the parking situation?

Depending on your location, parking could be no big deal or an extra fee of hundreds of dollars a month. If you have a car—or two or three—find out where you can park it, whether you get a dedicated spot, and how much that spot is going to cost per month. Find out what street parking is like. In some neighborhoods, it might not be possible, or you could spend the night before street cleaning circling the block for an hour.

6. What happens if I need to break the lease?

A lot can happen in a year: a surprise new job, a sick parent, an injury, a cross-country love connection. If for some reason you absolutely have to move mid-lease, what will your options be? Some landlords will require you to buy your way out, while others will just want you to find a qualified tenant to take over your lease. Policies and laws vary widely, so make sure you know before you commit.

7. What can I change, and what do I have to change back?

Even though you’re renting, you’ll want to make the space your own. But before you start pinning accent wall colors, make sure your landlord is OK with your making changes.

Most places will let you do anything as long as you return it to the original condition. Otherwise the cost of fixing nail holes, repainting walls, and replacing light fixtures will probably come out of your deposit.

If you’re a DIY expert, though, talk through any ideas with your landlord once you’ve moved in. He or she might be interested in keeping some upgrades, or even help pay for the cost of materials or give you a break on rent for your labor. Just ask first.

For more information on apartments in Lynchburg, VA contact Walden Pond.

#HowYouLive

theweeklychallenger.com



Walden Pond Apartment Homes

1400-A Weeping Willow Drive, Lynchburg, VA 24501

Call: 855-755-8732
Email UsPondApt004@myLTSMail.com
View Map
Walden Pond Apartment Facebook Walden Pond Apartment Twitter Walden Pond Apartment Google Plus Walden Pond Apartment RSS Feed
Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: Closed

$696-$1,308